paulftompkins:

Next week, two of my worlds collide when The Thrilling Adventure Hour podcast crosses over with MPR’s WITS radio show.
WITS is a delightful program hosted by the most splendid John Moe, and upon which I have guested many many many times. You can catch it on the honest-to-God radio, or you can catch up with it via podcast here.
Beyond Belief is a segment of the live, staged fake-radio show The Thrilling Adventure Hour. Each segment of TAH is podcast individually. The Beyond Belief segment— starring myself and Paget Brewster as Frank and Sadie Doyle— concerns a pair of boozy paranormal investigators who are married to each other and to booze. It’s The Thin Man with ghosts. And more booze.
Booze.
Frank & Sadie Doyle, along with musical guests Rhett Miller and "Weird Al" Yankovic, will be visiting WITS on Friday, October 24th.
If you want to catch up on the adventures of Frank & Sadie Doyle. here are all of their adventures for your listening pleasure. They’re all about 20 minutes or so, with the occasional super-sized special episode along the way. I personally recommend all of them.
Beyond Belief Episode Guide
Hell is the Loneliest Number (TAH #1)
Wishing Hell (TAH #5)
The Devil and Mr. Jones (TAH #10)
Second Star to the Wrong (TAH #15)
She Blinded Me With Seance (TAH #20)
Rosemary’s Baby Shower (TAH #25)
Love Love Me Doom (TAH #32)
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang You’re Dead (TAH #37)
Interview with Frank and Sadie (TAH #39)
White Hunter, Drunk Heart (TAH #42)
Vampire Weekend (TAH #48)
Winter of the House of Usher (TAH #52)
A Dave at the Races (TAH #54)
Romanian Holiday (TAH #59)
Teenagers of the Corn (TAH #63)
Nuns the Word (TAH #68)
Goatbusters (TAH #72)
Djinn and Tonic (TAH #76)
Sarcophagus Now (TAH #80)
The Yesterday Shop on Today Street (TAH #88)
The Haunting of Howard Schroeder (TAH #93)
Caped Fear (TAH #96)
Bah, Murderbug (TAH #98)
Forged in Flame (TAH #101)
A Beyond Belief Valentines Day (TAH #106)
How To Spell Revenge (TAH #109)
Making Spirits Fight (TAH #114)
The Devil You Know (TAH #116)
Cursed at First Bite (TAH #122)
Art Imitates Life (TAH #125)
The Deceased Charm of the Bourgeoisie (TAH #129)
Molar Express (TAH #133)
Touch of Keeble (TAH #140)
Son of Beyond Belief & Ladies and Skeleton (TAH #143)
Claus and Effect (TAH #147)
Basil’s Day (TAH #149)
When Cthulu Cthalls (TAH #153)
Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Corpse (TAH #156)
The Heart is a Lonely Haunter (TAH #159)
Bon Viv-Haunt (TAH #164)
Prelude to a Fish (TAH #167)
The Bloodsucker Proxy - Original Variant (TAH #172) and Variant A (TAH #179)
Jones On Third (TAH #178)
Werewolf of Wall Street (TAH #183)
Beyond Belief poster: Tom Fowler
paulftompkins:

Next week, two of my worlds collide when The Thrilling Adventure Hour podcast crosses over with MPR’s WITS radio show.
WITS is a delightful program hosted by the most splendid John Moe, and upon which I have guested many many many times. You can catch it on the honest-to-God radio, or you can catch up with it via podcast here.
Beyond Belief is a segment of the live, staged fake-radio show The Thrilling Adventure Hour. Each segment of TAH is podcast individually. The Beyond Belief segment— starring myself and Paget Brewster as Frank and Sadie Doyle— concerns a pair of boozy paranormal investigators who are married to each other and to booze. It’s The Thin Man with ghosts. And more booze.
Booze.
Frank & Sadie Doyle, along with musical guests Rhett Miller and "Weird Al" Yankovic, will be visiting WITS on Friday, October 24th.
If you want to catch up on the adventures of Frank & Sadie Doyle. here are all of their adventures for your listening pleasure. They’re all about 20 minutes or so, with the occasional super-sized special episode along the way. I personally recommend all of them.
Beyond Belief Episode Guide
Hell is the Loneliest Number (TAH #1)
Wishing Hell (TAH #5)
The Devil and Mr. Jones (TAH #10)
Second Star to the Wrong (TAH #15)
She Blinded Me With Seance (TAH #20)
Rosemary’s Baby Shower (TAH #25)
Love Love Me Doom (TAH #32)
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang You’re Dead (TAH #37)
Interview with Frank and Sadie (TAH #39)
White Hunter, Drunk Heart (TAH #42)
Vampire Weekend (TAH #48)
Winter of the House of Usher (TAH #52)
A Dave at the Races (TAH #54)
Romanian Holiday (TAH #59)
Teenagers of the Corn (TAH #63)
Nuns the Word (TAH #68)
Goatbusters (TAH #72)
Djinn and Tonic (TAH #76)
Sarcophagus Now (TAH #80)
The Yesterday Shop on Today Street (TAH #88)
The Haunting of Howard Schroeder (TAH #93)
Caped Fear (TAH #96)
Bah, Murderbug (TAH #98)
Forged in Flame (TAH #101)
A Beyond Belief Valentines Day (TAH #106)
How To Spell Revenge (TAH #109)
Making Spirits Fight (TAH #114)
The Devil You Know (TAH #116)
Cursed at First Bite (TAH #122)
Art Imitates Life (TAH #125)
The Deceased Charm of the Bourgeoisie (TAH #129)
Molar Express (TAH #133)
Touch of Keeble (TAH #140)
Son of Beyond Belief & Ladies and Skeleton (TAH #143)
Claus and Effect (TAH #147)
Basil’s Day (TAH #149)
When Cthulu Cthalls (TAH #153)
Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Corpse (TAH #156)
The Heart is a Lonely Haunter (TAH #159)
Bon Viv-Haunt (TAH #164)
Prelude to a Fish (TAH #167)
The Bloodsucker Proxy - Original Variant (TAH #172) and Variant A (TAH #179)
Jones On Third (TAH #178)
Werewolf of Wall Street (TAH #183)
Beyond Belief poster: Tom Fowler

paulftompkins:

Next week, two of my worlds collide when The Thrilling Adventure Hour podcast crosses over with MPR’s WITS radio show.

WITS is a delightful program hosted by the most splendid John Moe, and upon which I have guested many many many times. You can catch it on the honest-to-God radio, or you can catch up with it via podcast here.

Beyond Belief is a segment of the live, staged fake-radio show The Thrilling Adventure Hour. Each segment of TAH is podcast individually. The Beyond Belief segment— starring myself and Paget Brewster as Frank and Sadie Doyle— concerns a pair of boozy paranormal investigators who are married to each other and to booze. It’s The Thin Man with ghosts. And more booze.

Booze.

Frank & Sadie Doyle, along with musical guests Rhett Miller and "Weird Al" Yankovic, will be visiting WITS on Friday, October 24th.

If you want to catch up on the adventures of Frank & Sadie Doyle. here are all of their adventures for your listening pleasure. They’re all about 20 minutes or so, with the occasional super-sized special episode along the way. I personally recommend all of them.

Beyond Belief Episode Guide

Beyond Belief poster: Tom Fowler

(via anniewu)

kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

#EXCUSE ME MA’AM BUT YOUR TITTIES ARE NOT CONES I’M CALLING BULLSHIT (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.
1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.
2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.
3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.
Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.
There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.
Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.
The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?
Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.
kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

#EXCUSE ME MA’AM BUT YOUR TITTIES ARE NOT CONES I’M CALLING BULLSHIT (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.
1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.
2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.
3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.
Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.
There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.
Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.
The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?
Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.

kk-maker:

2spoopy5you:

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

so what you are saying is S.H.E.I.L.D. has a super shitty costume division….

Nope, Nick Fury totally did this on purpose.

There’s no knowing what kind of condition Steve’s in, or what kind of person he really is, after decades of nostalgia blur the reality and the long years in the ice (after a plane crash and a shitload of radiation) do their work. (Pre-crash Steve is in lots of files, I’m sure. Nick Fury does not trust files.) So Fury instructs his people to build a stage, and makes sure that the right people put up some of the wrong cues.

Maybe the real Steve’s a dick, or just an above-average jock; maybe he had a knack for hanging out with real talent. Maybe he hit his head too hard on the landing and he’s not gonna be Captain anymore. On the flipside, if he really is smart, then putting him in a standard, modern hospital room and telling him the truth is going to have him clamming up and refusing to believe a goddamn thing he hears for a really long time.

The real question here is, how long it does it take for the man, the myth, the legend to notice? What does he do about it? How long does he wait to get his bearings, confirm his suspicions, and gather information before attempting busting out?

Turns out the answer’s about forty-five seconds.

(via bombshellsandbluebells)

everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)
everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual ComedyBecause he’s just better than everyone else.(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)

everyframeapainting:

Edgar Wright - How to Do Visual Comedy
Because he’s just better than everyone else.

(Note: This got way bigger than I ever expected it to get.)

(via paulftompkins)

I’m really enjoying Mulaney so I was sad to hear it basically got cancelled this week. I know everybody’s been saying it’s too similar to Seinfeld, but there’s a manic absurdity to Mulaney that I think makes it unique, and if he were given more time I feel like John would definitely have won the critics over. It’s really too bad he apparently won’t be getting the chance. 

Today I had sort of a strong-yet-sensitive nightclub bouncer look going on and I was into it.

I think I’m saying “Welcome to Comic Con”

Look at how shiny my head is!

The History of the Eagles is on Netflix and after watching it I…

Listen I love their body of work, but Glenn Frey is a real dickhead. Like really? Don Felder is to blame for literally EVERY problem the band has had for the last 35 years? God, what an ego. At least Henley is a little more self-aware.

For years my roommate mrgreenmonkey and I have been working sporadically on the script for a comic book that we’d like to pitch to Image (I have been developing the idea since high school). It’s really hard to stay motivated after so many false starts and rewrites; I’ve written (and deleted in disgust) about 7 distinct drafts just in the last 18 months, but I think we finally have a strong, concrete vision for what we want to say. It’s just a matter of putting in the time now, which is of course the hardest part.